Category Archives: Unknown

Alliance-Theological-NYC

Alliance Theological Seminary – NYC

In addition to the main campus of Alliance Theological Seminary (ATS) which is located in Rockland County, New York, there is a large satellite campus located between downtown and midtown in the area known as TriBeCa. Established in 1997, the goal of the ATS-NYC campus is to make seminary studies accessible to those who work in the city and to provide a thoroughly urban context for theological education.

Founder Dr. Albert B. Simpson conducted the very first classes on the back of a Broadway stage then relocated to the lower Hudson Valley in Rockland County, New York in 1987. After 100 years, Alliance Theological Seminary returned to the city in 1997. Today, Alliance Theological Seminary serves over 1,300 students in the New York campus. ATS-NYC campus currently offers graduate degree programs on Master in Divinity, Master of Professional Studies and Master of Arts in Biblical Literature.

Master of Divinity at Alliance Theological Seminary – NYC

ATS-NYC’s Master of Divinity is a 93-credit program which is recognized as the most comprehensive and basic level graduate preparing for ministerial leadership and for future study in the theological disciplines. The M. Div. curriculum develops progressively over three years through the Person Phase, the Church Phase and the Ministry Phase. Please refer to the ATS-Nyack for more information

The purpose of the Master of Divinity degree is to produce whole people for general leadership in Christian service, whether in their own on in another culture, by bringing into dialogue with the various dimensions of theological education (church and academy; theology and social science inquiry; the biblical world and the contemporary world; classroom and experience; character and competence; and wisdom and skill.)

Required Master of Divinity Core Courses – (48 credits)

  • Proclamation & Communication (3)
  • Worship Arts & Disciplines (3)
  • Working with People (3)
  • People as Social & Cultural Beings (3)
  • Church as a Social & Cultural Institution (3)
  • Perspectives in Mission (3)
  • Reading the New Testament (3)
  • Greek Bible & Western Mediterranean World (3)
  • Hermeneutics (3)
  • Reading the Old Testament (3)
  • Hebrew Bible & Eastern Mediterranean World (3)
  • Personal/Prof/Theol Foundations for Ministry (3)
  • Biblical Theology (3)
  • Theology in the Global Context (3)
  • History of Christianity (3)
  • Church in the Urban World (3)

Mentored Development Courses – 9 credits

  • SF 503 – 1st Year Initiation in Spiritual Formation (3)
  • SF 603 – 2nd Year Field Education (3)
  • SF 703 – 3rd Year Spiritual Formation Capstone (3)

The Urban Ministries Track: As part of the Master of Divinity curriculum, students are required to pick a track to specialized in. The Urban Ministries track is offered primarily at the Manhattan Campus and this track emphasizes the perspectives and specialized training necessary for ministry in an urban environment. This track includes the following 6 courses/ 18 credits.

  • Christian Ethics (3)
  • Urban Theology (3)
  • Urban Church & the Poor (3)
  • Urban Community & Worldview Analysis (3)
  • Urban Community Development (3)
  • Leadership Development & the Urban Church (3)

Aside from the Urban Ministries Track, Bible and Theology Track and Church Development Track is offered in ATS-NYC Campus. [Please refer to the ATS-Nyack for more information]

Professional Development Courses: In addition to the tracks, students select 6 professional development courses (18 credits) of their choosing within the ATS curriculum or in consultation with the Dean, from other graduate programs within the Nyack College System. This flexibility allows for further study in areas related to career goals and personal interest.

More information about the curriculum of Alliance Theological Seminary.

Northern-Baptist

Northern Seminary

Located in Lombard, Illinois near Chicago, Northern Seminary is an evangelical graduate seminary that prepares students for church leadership. The seminary continues to represent a ‘theologically conservative alternative’ within the American Baptist Churches in the United States. Northern Seminary was founded in 1913, and for 100 years later, the seminary is still focused in faithfully training students to become leaders that will serve Jesus Christ with evangelical passion and mission skills in Biblically grounded and culturally relevant ministries.

Anderson-University

Anderson University School of Theology

Anderson University School of Theology is the only seminary of the Church of God (Anderson, Indiana). Our ongoing relationship with our sponsoring church is valued, and a vital partnership necessary for providing spiritual leaders for the church in the 21st century. The seminary community is also enriched by the variety of church backgrounds and ethnic heritage of its students, faculty, and staff.

Anderson University was founded by and is supported by the Church of God, with headquarters in Anderson, Ind. Founded in 1917, the school was a major step in the life of a young and vigorous fellowship of Christians which had originated about 1880. This fellowship, which took on a common New Testament name, often describes itself as a reformation movement. Its vision was to preach and live out a message of holiness and to invite believers into a body united by a common experience in the saving grace of Jesus Christ.

Anderson University has grown to comprise an undergraduate liberal arts program, organized into two colleges and three schools, a graduate School of Theology, and a center for adult education (the School of Adult Learning). The university offers several graduate degree programs, including the Doctor of Business Administration (D.B.A.), Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.), Master of Education (M.Ed.), and Master of Music Education (M.M.E.) degrees, and a dual Master of Science in Nursing – Master of Business Administration (M.S.N. – M.B.A.) degree. More than 2,800 students and nearly 300 instructional and professional staff comprise the community.

WMU-photo

World Mission University

On September 28, 1988, the Oriental Mission Church implemented a special committee to pray about the need for a new seminary for training missionaries, pastors, and lay leaders. When the meeting adjourned, the seed that would become World Mission Theological Seminary had been planted. In March 1989, World Mission Theological Seminary started with thirty-two students and Rev. Dong Sun Lim was appointed as the first President.

World Mission Theological Seminary was authorized to issue the Master of Divinity and Master of Arts degrees in 1991, and the Bachelor of Arts degree in 1992 by the California Department of Education. In 1993, the name of the institution was changed from World Mission Theological Seminary to World Mission University to reflect the school’s broader offering of programs.

In August 2003, the institution moved to a new location in Koreatown, a center of downtown Los Angeles. In 2004, World Mission University achieved Candidate Status with the Association for Biblical Higher Education (ABHE). Today, World Mission University is accredited by both the Association of Biblical Higher Education and the Transnational Association of Christian Colleges and Schools. World Mission University also has Candidate Status with the Association of Theological Schools in the United States and Canada. All three accrediting agencies are members of the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA) and recognized by the United States Department of Education.

Bethel-Seminary-Washington-DC

Bethel Seminary (DC)

One of two training centers of the Bethel Seminary of the East. Bethel Seminary of the East trains students in the dense populations of New England and Washington, D.C. These convenient teaching centers make seminary education accessible – allowing students to stay in their local communities and ministries.

Bethel University hold programs in existing churches to give students an opportunity to engage in mentorship and community building. Plus, the resources we would use on facilities are channeled right into developing our students.

Bethel University is affiliated with and supported by the congregations of the Baptist General Conference. Fully accredited by the Higher Learning Commission—North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, the university is also a member of the Christian College Consortium.

Bethel University began in Chicago, Illinois as a seminary for Baptist immigrants from Sweden. John Alexis Edgren opened a department for Scandinavian theological students in the fall of 1871 in the basement of First Swedish Baptist Church in Chicago starting in 1871. The seminary merged with Bethel Academy in Saint Paul, Minnesota in 1914. In 1931 the Academy became Bethel Junior College. The addition of a four-year liberal arts college program created Bethel College and Seminary in 1947. The school relocated from St. Paul to Arden Hills, Minnesota in 1972. Beginning in 2004, the institution changed its name to Bethel University.

Bethel-Seminary-Auburn

Bethel Seminary of the East

Bethel Seminary of the East trains students in the dense populations of New England and Washington, D.C. These convenient teaching centers make seminary education accessible – allowing students to stay in their local communities and ministries.

Bethel University hold programs in existing churches to give students an opportunity to engage in mentorship and community building. Plus, the resources we would use on facilities are channeled right into developing our students.

Bethel University is affiliated with and supported by the congregations of the Baptist General Conference. Fully accredited by the Higher Learning Commission—North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, the university is also a member of the Christian College Consortium.

Bethel University began in Chicago, Illinois as a seminary for Baptist immigrants from Sweden. John Alexis Edgren opened a department for Scandinavian theological students in the fall of 1871 in the basement of First Swedish Baptist Church in Chicago starting in 1871. The seminary merged with Bethel Academy in Saint Paul, Minnesota in 1914. In 1931 the Academy became Bethel Junior College. The addition of a four-year liberal arts college program created Bethel College and Seminary in 1947. The school relocated from St. Paul to Arden Hills, Minnesota in 1972. Beginning in 2004, the institution changed its name to Bethel University.

Bethel-Seminary-San-Diego

Bethel Seminary – San Diego

Serving students in the southwestern United States, Bethel Seminary San Diego is situated on a beautiful campus in Southern California. Currently, the seminary occupies a 20,000 square-foot seminary building that house offices, classrooms, a student center and expanded library facilities with more than 80,000 volumes. Its 300 women and men represent a wide diversity of ages, cultures, vocations, and denominational backgrounds making the seminary experience valuable in ways beyond the classroom.

Although Bethel Seminary is affiliated with Converge Worldwide (Baptist General Conference), they also serve students from more than 50 other denominations. Dr. John R. Lillis is the Dean and Executive Officer of Bethel Seminary San Diego and has served in those positions since 2001. Under his leadership, enrollment has increased dramatically, the number of masters degrees offered has nearly doubled, and the school has added a doctoral degree program.

Briercrest-College

Briercrest College and Seminary

Briercrest College and Seminary is a community of rigorous learning that calls students to seek the kingdom of God, to be shaped profoundly by the Scriptures, and to be formed spiritually and intellectually for lives of service. Briercrest College and Seminary also operates Caronport High School.

Its precursor was a home Bible study in the village of Briercrest, Saskatchewan, which grew to include several members of the community. Eventually the group formed a new church, the Briercrest Gospel Assembly. The people needed a pastor to lead the church and wanted to open a Bible school.

Henry Hildebrand was a student at Winnipeg Bible Institute and a circuit riding preacher with Canadian Sunday School Mission (CSSM). Mr. Sinclair Whittaker, one of the believers at Briercrest, was a businessman and a former Conservative member of the provincial legislature. He contacted Henry, informing him of their need for a pastor and their desire to open a Bible school. Eventually Hildebrand agreed to join them at Briercrest.

Briercrest Bible Institute opened its doors on October 19, 1935, and 11 students enrolled. A rented house served as dormitory, classroom, and office for the school. Mr. Hildebrand was principal and Mrs. Annie Hillson, Mrs. Isabel Whittaker, Jean Whittaker, and Margaret Rusk helped with teaching and administration. Donald McMillan joined them in the second term as assistant principal.

By 1946, they had outgrown their facility, and Mr. Whittaker arranged the purchase of Royal Airforce Base #33 in Caron for $50,000. The new facility was dedicated on July 1, 1946, and the task of converting the airbase into dormitories, classrooms, offices, and staff housing began.

Caronport High School opened in September 1946. A grade school also began that year. Enrollment grew in all of the schools and many new buildings were constructed to accommodate the growing student body. In the early 1970s, the schools began to recognize the need for academic credibility. Briercrest became a candidate for accreditation with the Accrediting Association of Bible Colleges (now the Association for Biblical Higher Education) in 1973, and became accredited in 1976. The school was given authority to grant degrees in 1974. In 1979, a distance learning program was launched. In 1982, the name Briercrest Bible Institute was changed to Briercrest Bible College. The seminary began in 1983, and receive accreditation from the Association of Theological Schools in 1998. College enrollment grew from 285 in 1970 to 775 in 1985.

Providence-Theological

Providence Theological Seminary

Providence Theological Seminary is an evangelical institution whose purpose is to serve the Church, in the accomplishment of its mission, by preparing and supporting leaders, developing resources, and facilitating theological reflection.

Providence began in Winnipeg in 1925 as Winnipeg Bible Training School, the vision of Rev. H.L. Turner. The name was soon changed to Winnipeg Bible Institute. Over the next 45 years it remained a small but academically vibrant school. It received a provincial charter to grant theological degrees in 1949 and was renamed Winnipeg Bible Institute and College of Theology. In 1963 the college moved to a full degree-granting program and was again re-named, this time to Winnipeg Bible College, a name it retained until 1991.

In 1970, Winnipeg Bible College faced a financial and enrolment crisis. The building it was occupying in Winnipeg was slated for destruction and the school needed a new home. That new home turned out to be St. Joseph’s College, a Roman Catholic high school in Otterburne which had been closed a few years previously. The college moved there in the fall of 1970 with 70 students enrolled for classes. Within a few years the school had grown to 300 full-time students.

In 1972 a longtime dream became reality with the formation of a graduate division called Providence Theological Seminary. Since that time, the seminary has become one of Canada’s most respected interdenominational seminaries, with full membership in the Association of Theological Schools (ATS).

As early as 1931, President Rev. Forsberg, stated that “academic excellence and spiritual vitality should go hand in hand.” He envisioned strengthening the school through the addition of liberal arts and his vision continues. In the 1960s, Rev. Elmer Towns pushed Providence to “greater academic excellence while still maintaining a high level of Spirituality.” More liberal arts courses were added throughout our history and in 1991, a transferability arrangement was achieved with the University of Manitoba. At present, by far the majority of our College courses are transferable to public university programs across Canada and beyond.

In 1992, in an effort to more accurately represent both its theological roots and its broad academic program, the school’s name was changed to Providence College and Theological Seminary. The name is steeped in tradition — one of its buildings was named Providence House — and it also speaks of God’s provision for the school over its 80 years of providing the best in Christian education.

Grand-Rapids

Grand Rapids Theological Seminary

Grand Rapids Theological Seminary (GRTS) of Cornerstone University is a multidenominational evangelical Christian seminary located in Grand Rapids, Michigan. GRTS is an accredited member of the Association of Theological Schools in the United States and Canada, The Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, and is authorized by the Michigan State Board of Education to grant advanced theological degrees.

Grand Rapids Theological Seminary had its humble beginnings as an evening Bible institute at Wealthy Street Baptist Church in 1941. The Bible institute became a degree granting institution in 1963 and moved to its present location in 1964. The institution became a Christian liberal arts college in 1972 and became a state-approved university in 1999. Today Cornerstone University and Grand Rapids Theological Seminary share a 123-acre (0.50 km2) campus four miles (6 km) east of downtown Grand Rapids, Michigan. The campus currently supports the undergraduate college, with programs for traditional students as well as accelerated degree programs, graduate programs including Grand Rapids Theological Seminary and Asia Baptist Theological Seminary based in Thailand, and Cornerstone University Radio.

Grand Rapids Theological Seminary exists primarily to advance biblical knowledge and ministry skill, to encourage the development of critical thinking and worldview formation, to nurture a global ministry perspective, and to enhance culturally relevant ministry.

Today, Cornerstone and GRTS share a 130-acre campus less than five miles from downtown Grand Rapids and operate under a single board of trustees and university president. The seminary is located in the Leon J. Wood Seminary Building, which opened in 1977, and it has its own administrative staff and faculty.