Category Archives: Southern Baptist

Southwestern-Baptist-Houston

Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary – Houston Campus

Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary began offering theological education in Houston in 1975 with extension courses on the campus of Houston Baptist University. Twenty-five years later, a seminary looking for a home campus and a church looking to minister, joined forces to provide a full campus for master level studies in theology.

Park Place Baptist Church, true to its well known heritage of faith, deeded its facilities to Southwestern Seminary in 2002. The seminary began transforming the property into a state-of-the-art campus.

In 2004, Dr. J. Denny Autrey was named the first resident dean of Southwestern’s Havard School. Like the two Christian institutions that partnered to expand theological education in the Texas Gulf Coast, Autrey has a strong history of ministry and education.

Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, headquartered in Fort Worth, Texas, is a private, non-profit institution of higher education, associated with the Southern Baptist Convention. It is one of the largest seminaries in the world and is accredited by the Association of Theological Schools in the United States and Canada and also by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools to award diploma, bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral degrees. The school uses the Baptist Faith and Message (2000) as its confessional statement.

The seminary was established in 1908, with B. H. Carroll as its founding president. It grew out of the Baylor University theological department, which was established in 1901. By 1905, Carroll had managed to convert the department of five professors into the Baylor Theological Seminary, but still under Baylor University. In 1907, while Baylor University President Samuel Palmer Brooks was on vacation in Europe, B.H. Carroll, then chairman of the Baylor Board of Trustees, made a motion that the department of religion be separated from the University and chartered as a separate entity.

Midwestern-Baptist

Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary

Located in Kansas City, Missouri, Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary (MBTS) is a graduate school institution which serves a community of higher learning persons called to ministry. MBTS seeks to dramatically transform students by renewing their minds with biblical truth, impacting their hearts with a passion for ministry, and enriching their souls with deepened Christ-likeness. MBTS currently offers Master of Divinity, Doctor of Philosophy, Doctor of Education, Doctor of Ministry, Master of Arts, Bachelor of Science degrees, Associates degrees and certificates. So far, MBTS has awarded more than 3,500 theological degrees.

MBTS is one of the six official seminaries of the Southern Baptist Convention (SBC) and is governed by a board of 35 trustees who are elected by SBC. The trustees, in turn elect faculty members and administrative officers. Upon election of the faculty, each professor subscribes to the Baptist Faith and Message 2000 statement adopted by the SBC in 2000.

Dr. Jason K. Allen became the fifth president in 2012 of Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary. He was the youngest seminary president in the SBC and one of the youngest presidents in American higher education.

Southeastern-Baptist

Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary

Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary (SEBTS) is one of the largest seminary in the world located in Wake Forest, North Carolina. Founded in 1950 by the Southern Baptist Convention (SBC), SEBTS is mandated to train ministers for churches all over the east coast of the United States. The seminary currently offers three Doctorate programs, two different Master of Theology programs with ten different specializations for its Master of Divinity program, eight other Masters degree program, and a number of certificate programs.

Similar to Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, the same articles of faith are affirmed by the Board of Trustees and faculty of the Southeastern – the Abstract of Principles and the Baptist Faith and Message 2000.

Dr. Daniel L. Akin is the sixth President of Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary. Dr. Akin succeeded Dr. Paige Patterson, who now is the president of Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary.

New-Orleans

New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary

New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary (NOBTS) is one of the largest conservative Christian seminaries in the world affiliated with the Southern Baptist Convention (SBC). Located in the city of New Orleans, Louisiana, NOBTS has enrolled over 3,500 students coming from 39 states and 39 different nations. The Seminary is committed to making quality theological education as accessible and affordable to as many as possible. Therefore, NOBTS operates over a dozen extension center campuses across the Southeast. Approximately 1,900 students are located primarily on the New Orleans campus; the others are at extension centers.

NOBTS currently offers a wide range of degree options for ministerial training. NOBTS graduate programs offer over 20 special specializations designed to prepare students for service in the specific area of ministerial call. The Seminary’s faculty is divided into five working divisions: biblical studies, theological & historical studies, pastoral ministries, Christian Education ministries, and church music ministries. In addition to undergraduate and graduate-level studies programs, NOBTS also offers a research doctoral program designed to meet the needs of post-graduate students who seek preparation for teaching and specialized ministry leadership. Doctoral degrees are divided between research doctoral degree programs and professional doctoral degree programs.

NOBTS confessional commitments are outlined in the Articles of Religious Belief and the Baptist Faith and Message 2000.

At present, Dr. Charles “Chuck” Kelley serves as the president of New Orleans Theological Seminary. Prior to his election, he had served at the seminary for 13 years as the Roland Q. Leavell Professor of Evangelism and most recently as the director of the Seminary’s Leavell Center for Evangelism and Church Health.